Global Legal Practice Externship Program

To prepare students for the new reality of practicing law in a global legal environment, the Maurice A. Deane School of Law has established the Global Legal Practice Externship Program, which allows students to work over the summer in unpaid international legal field placements for academic credit. The program gives students two options to participate in, with the same academic requirements for both.

About the Program

The two options for student participation allow you to select the method that works best for you — being placed internationally or finding your own placement abroad. The program awards students 3 academic credits and requires participants to agree to the following conditions:

  • To be supervised by an attorney licensed to practice in that jurisdiction, who assigns substantive legal work and provides regular feedback.
  • To physically work in the employer’s office for a minimum of 200 hours over the summer.
  • To produce at least 20 pages of legal research and analysis that meets the satisfaction of the faculty member supervising the program.
  • To participate in a mandatory orientation program, which will review the academic requirements in more detail while exploring the skills necessary to maximize the externship placement opportunity, such as professionalism and office etiquette. The orientation will be offered in mid-May after spring semester finals examinations but before placements begin.
  • To participate in an online course throughout the summer, directed by the faculty member supervising the program.
  • To submit weekly journal entries and other written assignments.
  • To provide a four-page subjective paper at the end of the summer on the placement experience.

There are two placement options, each with different application procedures. With Placement Option I, we place you with an externship via our partnership with Global Experiences, Inc. With Placement Option II, Hofstra Law awards credit for externships you find on your own. Both options are supported by financial aid.